Peak District Mining Heritage Walks and Underground Mine Trips

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Here are the guided walks and underground mine visits we currently have planned for the next few months in the Derbyshire Peak District. Do keep checking back here, as more walks and underground trips will be added to the list. 

All our walks are free, and are open to all (not just PDMHS members). However, pre-booking is required when walks are limited to a certain number of people. As the walks are all also weather-dependent, we can keep you informed by email of any changes or cancellation in the event of bad weather. You can contact us at meets@pdmhs.com. Any changes due to weather conditions will also be posted on the website, so it is advisable to check back here before you set out.

Also, if you are planning on attending with a large number of friends, it would be worth checking with us in advance about car parking availability. 

Donate to support the work of Peak District Mines Historical SocietyOur walks are free but if you would like to express your appreciation, a donation would be very welcome. Alternatively you might like to join PDMHS.

Insurance is compulsory for those going on underground trips. The PDMHS UEG (Underground Exploration Group) can arrange this if you don’t already hold BCA insurance. You can contact the UEG here.

If you want to find out more information about any of our guided mining and industrial heritage walks, contact Chris at meets@pdmhs.com


Saturday February 16th – UEG Underground Trip into Devonshire Cavern, Lower Series, Matlock Bath. Fully booked.

Leader: Martin Long.

This trip will visit the down-dip workings of Devonshire Cavern, which mostly involves walking or stooping height passages, but some crawling may be involved. More details are in Mining History Volume.17 No.3.

Meet at 1pm at the Peak District Lead Mining Museum, Matlock Bath. Eight places available.

Booking is essential – contact meets@pdmhs.com to reserve your place.


Tuesday 12th March – Underground Trip into Arrock Black Marble Mine, Ashford.

Leader: Paul Chandler.

An easy grade, dry evening trip. There is a short, low crawl near the entrance which leads into the main part of the mine. The remainder of the mine is mainly walking or stooping size. Arrock is quite different to the Rookery Black Marble Mine nearby, in that timber has been used to support the roof, some of which, you might say, has seen better days! Although less extensive than the Rookery Mine, it is arguably more interesting.
Party size is limited: Only 3 places still available. Please book by no later than March 1st as there is a waiting list and the remaining places will be allocated then. Preference will be given to Society members who have not visited before. Please note: other guests have been invited, so book early!
BCA Public Liability Insurance Cover or similar is essential.
To book your place(s) and for meeting arrangements, please contact Paul Chandler. Email: paul.derbyshirecaver@btintenet.com or Tel: 07908-607513 (Mobile/Text is best) / 01246-220773 (Landline). 
Access is by permission from Chatsworth Estate. Optional drink after trip in the Bulls Head Inn, Ashford. 

References: Derbyshire Black Marble by J M Tomlinson, PDMHS Special Publication No.4 (1996) and Mining History (PDMHS) Vol.20, No.3 (2018). 


Tuesday 26th March 2019 – Underground Trip into Holmebank Chert Mine, Bakewell.
Leader: Paul Chandler.
Evening trip. Easy grade, dry trip(although lowest workings are flooded). An ideal trip for novices and also of interest to experienced explorers. Mostly large, walking or stooping size passages and easy scrambles. The mine is quite extensive, with around five miles of passages! The popular through trip is planned, exiting via the quarry entrance, with various points of interest enroute. An interesting mine and well worth bringing a camera.
Party size is limited: Only 4 places still available. Preference will be given to Society members who have not visited before. Please note: other guests have been invited, so book early!
BCA Public Liability Insurance Cover or similar is essential.
To book your place(s) and for meeting arrangements, please contact Paul Chandler. Email: paul.derbyshirecaver@btintenet.com or Tel: 07908-607513 (Mobile/Text is best) / 01246-220773 (Landline). 
Access is by kind permission of Oldfield Design, Bakewell.
 

References: Mining History (PDMHS) Vol.13, No.5 (1998) and Vol.19, No.6 (2017).  


Unfortunately, the North Wales Mines Weekend planned for March 8 – 10 has had to be cancelled due to low levels of interest.

 

Advance Notice – trip to Zip World Titan, Blaenau Ffestiniog – Interested?

Sit back and zip away as you and your friends fly down Europe’s largest zipping zone! Take flight on 3 exhilarating zip lines and soak up the amazing quarry views during the experience of a lifetime (Info from website). SUMMER Availability April – October. How many Zips? 3. How far? 1890m. Starting height 482m above sea level. Duration 2 hours. Cost? £50. WINTER Opening – £30, but only two Zips. Note: VELOCITY 2 is the scary/fast ZIP at Penrhyn Quarry, North Wales.
Organiser: Paul Chandler – It is intended that TITAN will form part of a walking/adventure weekend, I am planning in North Wales, possibly in May 2019. If interested, please register your interest (without obligation at this stage) with Paul. Email: paul.derbyshirecaver@btinternet.com or Tel: 07908-607513 (Mobile/Text is best) / 01246-220773 (Landline).

Cave Biology – bargain book

This Cambridge University Press book about Cave Biology is currently (23/12/18) available on-line reduced from £44.99 to £14.99 from Postcript Books

Written for academic researchers and graduate students, this book provides a critical examination of current knowledge and ideas on cave biology, with emphasis on evolution, ecology and conservation.

Dave Williams

It is with great sadness that we must announce that
former PDMHS Chairman and Hon. Recorder, and
long standing Society member, Dave Williams passed
away peacefully in the afternoon of Tuesday the 20th of
November in the Burton Closes Care Home in Bakewell.
Dave’s many contributions to the study of mining history
are immense, and he will be greatly missed.
We extend our sincerest condolences and heartfelt
sympathy to Dave’s family and his very many friends in
the mining history community, and beyond.

A full obituary will be published in the April Newsletter.

Mike Luff and Steve Thompson

Observations & Discoveries

The quarterly newsletter usually carries a section: Observations & Discoveries.  Adam Russell constructed an index which Rob has converted to a database which can be seen in the Members section of the web-site. Each site in the database has links to both Ordnance Survey and Google maps in order to benefit from the unique features of each. This is now enhanced with Google and OS maps showing all indexed sites on a single map with clickable links to the relevant newsletters.  It is hoped that this will encourage more members to lead heritage walks by helping identify sites to visit and providing easy access to the often extensive O&D notes about those sites.

A demonstration of that is below in a short video, the image quality is compromised in order to reduce the file size and make the video load faster. You can change the settings to HD for a better image and click the bottom-right icon to make it full screen. 

The database and interactive maps can be found in the members only section of the web site.

Stoney Middleton Mining Heritage Walk Report

The weather forecasts before our walk on October 13th had been pretty ominous, with rain, high winds and even lightening forecast. But PDMHS walkers are a hardy bunch, and a total of 14 of us turned out to brave the elements at our meeting place at the bottom of Coombs Dale in Stoney Middleton

This was an all-day circular walk which was packed with features of mining interest. Only a couple of fields from our starting point, we crossed over Peakstone Rake by the site of Wren Park Mine, before entering Coombsdale Wood with its old limestone quarry. The quarry has been used as a tip for domestic waste in the past, and here we found a large shaft covered with scaffolding poles – which we concluded was probably an old lime kiln which has been almost completely buried by the tipping. Continue reading